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The Two Toys

By @Natalia-Feldman

Oh, in this morning the mother puzzled in earnest her daughter Lizzie: she must choose one of her two most favourite toys, either Winnie the Pooh or puppy Skye, because she could take only one with her on the road. This distressed very much Lizzie because it was not easy for her to make a choice from these two toys. She loved them both, equally. In vain, the girl tried to persuade her mother to allow her to take both toys with her. “But why do you need two toys?” the mother did not understand. “When we get to the grandmother I’ll buy you a bunch of them.”

“But I don’t want others I want these,” Lizzie was capricious. 

But the mother refused to understand her and declared categorically, “only one”.                     “Mommy, please,” the girl sniffled. 

“Well, think about it, daughter, how will you carry two toys in your hands?” objected the woman.

“One toy can be put in a suitcase,” Lizzie found a solution. 

But the mother shook her head. 

“There is no place there. I leave here my favourite dresses, dishware, computer — I leave everything! And you tell me about some toys!”

Pouting, Lizzie walked away from her mother, offended. Why cannot the mom understand her? They can do without dresses, without a computer and, in the end, without dishes (the grandmother’s kitchen cupboard is full of these dishes), but she cannot leave a favourite toy. How is it possible to forsake alone it in an empty room? Lizzie imagined how Winnie the Pooh or Skye would stay here, abandoned by her forever, how they would sit lonely on a shelf and wait for her when she come back and get them.

But she will never come back, the mom told her, because they go far away, to another city. And they will live alone, apart the dad, but together grandma Hanna, her mother’s mother. Lizzie was a pity to part with dad, too. But the dad is grown up, he will not cry, but Winnie the Pooh and Skye are little, and they will miss her, their mistress, very, very much and, probably, at night, when no one will see them they would cry.

To make a difficult choice Lizzie sat two toys on the bed in front of her and alternately looked at one, then the other. Winnie the Pooh was the big yellow bear in the red T-shirt, with kind eyes and with a broad smile. It was given to Lizzie by her dad for her birthday, year before last, when she turned five. Lizzie almost never parted with this toy, having carried everywhere with her and putting slept in her bed.

Skye was pink with a funny puppy face and with big eyes. It was also presented on Lizzie’s birthday, but for the past. It was given by her other grandmother, not the one where they are going to, but father’s mother.

Lizzie loved both her father and grandmother, equally, but she loved the dad more. But Skye was much prettier, although Lizzie did not carry it everywhere, like Winnie the Pooh. It was just that the puppy was still new, and Lizzie was saving it. Besides, if Lizzie takes Winnie the Pooh with her she will offend her grandmother in this way. And suddenly, when her grandmother came to visit her, she would ask where that toy she gave her. What would Lizzie say to that? That she neglected her gift? No, Lizzie did not want to offend her grandmother.

The little girl sighed heavily and decided to speak to her mother again: suddenly she will allow her to take both toys. The mother was talking to someone on the phone in the next room. “Yes, Mom, I make up my mind,” said mother Agnes into the phone. “I have no more patience. He came drunk again yesterday. He threw his shoes in the middle of the hall. Then he scolded me for, as it seemed to him, I to have overheated a pizza. Do you know how much effort did I have to restrain myself and not throw pizza at him? I would have done so if I didn’t known that he was capable of striking.”

The voice on the phone asked incredulously about something mother Agnes, and she replied, “Yes, he is capable. I didn’t want to tell you, Mom, because I didn’t want to upset you. But a couple of times he was already threatening me … Not, not in jest, Mom. I assure you, not in jest. You should have seen his face at that moment. If Lizzie were not around, I’m sure he would have … No, this is over, I already bought tickets. So, wait for me, Mom, on a station platform tomorrow.” 

The voice on the phone spoke something again.

“What for?” asked mother Agnes. “Let him have a “pleasant surprise” in the evening. Let him admire the empty wardrobes and shelves.”

And then mother Agnes noticed the daughter, who was hesitantly looking out of the next room. Covering the phone with her palm, she asked the girl, “What?”

“Mom, well, may I take two toys? I can’t choose from them,” said the girl.

“Lizzie, please, don’t distract me for trifles anymore,” sternly said the mother and, turning away, continued the conversation with grandmother Hanna.

Drooping her head, the girl trudged back and sat down on the bed next to the toys. There is nothing to do, it was necessary to choose: one of the toys would stay here with her dad. Lizzie once again looked first at Winnie the Pooh, then at Skye, and realized that she would not be able part with the toy that her dad had given to her. “But don’t be offended, dear Skye,” said Lizzie to another toy. “I also love you, very, very much.”

And hugged it, the girl held closely the toy to her chest.

In the evening, Lizzie together with her mother and their two heavy, full of things suitcases rode in a train carriage that was taking them to another city. Lizzie sat at the window with upon Winnie the Pooh on her lap, and pointed it to cows grazing in the meadows, then to cars standing in a row at the crossing before the barrier, and spoke in an important voice, “See, Winnie, these are the cows, they give milk. Don’t be afraid of them, although they’re big and they’ve horns they’re kind. And these are the cars, they can’t go until the train passes.”

Lizzie still had a lot to show and tell Winnie the Pooh because before it had never travelled anywhere. Unlike him, the little girl went by train to her grandmother every summer therefore she already knew a lot.

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