Celebrate Your Right to Read During #BannedBooksWeek!

Celebrate your right to read during #BannedBooksWeek!

Words are powerful.

Books are powerful.

YOU are powerful.

 

Here is a list of just some of the many classic and powerful  children’s and YA books that have been challenged or banned:

The Chocolate War

The Chocolate War

By Robert Cormier

Cormier’s chilling look at the insidious world of gang intimidation and the abuse of power in a boys’ boarding school is no less relevant today than it was in 1974.

The Face on the Milk Carton

The Face on the Milk Carton

By Caroline B. Cooney

No one ever really paid close attention to the faces of the missing children on the milk cartons. But as Janie Johnson glanced at the face of the ordinary little girl with her hair in tight pigtails, wearing a dress with a narrow white collar—a three-year-old who had been kidnapped twelve years before from a shopping mall in New Jersey—she felt overcome with shock. She recognized that little girl—it was she. How could it possibly be true?

 

Janie can’t believe that her loving parents kidnapped her, but as she begins to piece things together, nothing makes sense. Something is terribly wrong. Are Mr. and Mrs. Johnson really her parents? And if not, who is Janie Johnson, and what really happened?

His Dark Materials, Book I: The Golden Compass

His Dark Materials, Book I: The Golden Compass

By Philip Pullman

The modern fantasy classic that Entertainment Weekly named an “All-Time Greatest Novel” and Newsweek hailed as a “Top 100 Book of All Time.” Philip Pullman takes readers to a world where humans have animal familiars and where parallel universes are within reach.

The Cay

The Cay

By Theodore Taylor

For fans of Hatchet and Island of the Blue Dolphins comes Theodore Taylor’s classic bestseller and Lewis Carroll Shelf Award winner, The Cay.

 

Phillip is excited when the Germans invade the small island of Curaçao. War has always been a game to him, and he’s eager to glimpse it firsthand–until the freighter he and his mother are traveling to the United States on is torpedoed.

 

When Phillip comes to, he is on a small raft in the middle of the sea. Besides Stew Cat, his only companion is an old West Indian, Timothy. Phillip remembers his mother’s warning about black people: “They are different, and they live differently.”

 

But by the time the castaways arrive on a small island, Phillip’s head injury has made him blind and dependent on Timothy.

Thirteen Reasons Why

Thirteen Reasons Why

By Jay Asher

Clay Jensen returns home from school to find a strange package with his name on it lying on his porch. Inside he discovers several cassette tapes recorded by Hannah Baker—his classmate and crush—who committed suicide two weeks earlier. Hannah’s voice tells him that there are thirteen reasons why she decided to end her life. Clay is one of them. If he listens, he’ll find out why.

Clay spends the night crisscrossing his town with Hannah as his guide. He becomes a firsthand witness to Hannah’s pain, and as he follows Hannah’s recorded words throughout his town, what he discovers changes his life forever.

Looking for Alaska

Looking for Alaska

By John Green

The award-winning, genre-defining debut from #1 bestselling author of The Fault in Our Stars.

The Outsiders

The Outsiders

By S.E. Hinton

First published in 1967, S. E. Hinton’s novel was an immediate phenomenon. Today, with more than eight million copies sold, The Outsiders continues to resonate with its powerful portrait of the bonds and boundaries of friendship.

For more information on why these books were challenged or banned, click here.

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